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Review: Maclan Racing MMax Pro 160A ESC with MRR 13.5T Brushless Motor

Review: Maclan MaxPro 160A ESC with MRR 13.5T Brushless Motor

As the envelope gets pushed farther and farther to get the most from modern electronics, doors open that were not there months before. Striving to be the next big thing in this hobby is no easy feat, but Maclan Racing has stepped up, excepted the challenge, and pushed itself right to the front of the pack. Read on to see the latest ESC technology.

Specifics
Product: Maclan MMax Pro 160A Competition 1/10 ESC
Part Number: MCL 2003 w/o Program Link
Cost: $219.99

Dimension: 40x30x19mm (w/o cooling fan)
Weight: 48g (w/o wires and capacitor module)
CPU: Super speed 32-bit CPU with 5-stage pipeline
Recommended Scale: 1:10th
Mode: Sensored/ Smart Sensorless
Continuous Current: 160A
MOSFET Rated Current: 400A/phase
Power Input: 2S LiPo
Motor Limit: 2-Pole 3.5T
BEC Output: Linear Mode 6V to7.4V, 4A
Cooling Fan: 30x30x10mm HV turbo fan

What’s in the Box
Some say great things come in a small packages. I think this little black box is jammed packed with goodies to handle the most extreme 1:10 racing applications. Upon opening the box, everything is neatly tucked away and all you see the side of the ESC. Pulling it out of its resting spot exposes the other bits included in the box. The ESC comes pre-wired with 12 gauge black wires, pre-wired large 3-capacitor bank, 30mm fan, modular receiver lead, modular on/off switch and USB cable to attach the ESC to either a computer or Pro Link settings card. I’d highly recommend getting the card for some of the easiest and in depth programming on the market.

Review: Maclan MaxPro 160A ESC with MRR 13.5T Brushless MotorFeatures
Well, the shining star of this ESC has got to be the all new technology using a 32 bit CPU for highest processing speeds above all others. Maclan has given the new esc cutting edge technology, allowing for unrivaled power and braking while keeping the driver in control at all times. Showing off with jewelry-like looks, the MMax Pro struts its stuff in a full aluminum CNC’d case and heatsink with laser engraved logos and designation ports. Multiple ports are available for the 30mm fan, optional on/off switch, receiver wire and an onboard micro USB port that gives direct access for updates and programming as well as expandability for future improvements. A first in the hobby with this idea.

Along with all the conventional programming features of today’s ESC’s, Maclan’s MMax Pro has fine tuning for both the throttle and braking parameters. It sports an advanced boost settings that will make pie cutters out of any wheels, providing immense power for days. Your competition is going to hate being on the receiving end of this little powerhouse.

Review: Maclan MaxPro 160A ESC with MRR 13.5T Brushless MotorThe beautiful aluminum case not only looks the part, but keeps this ESC cucumber-cool even when tested in my 5.5T-equipped 4WD buggy, and that’s without the cooling fan. I would, however, highly recommend using the HV 30mm fan in excessive cases like this to keep temps at a minimum. The ESC comes pre-wired with 12 gauge wire that is installed vertically onto gold mini posts for a perfect connection. The external power capacitor is also attached in the same fashion and the sensor ports are directly below the power and A/B/C terminals.

I’d also touch on an additional feature; the switch. How many times have you had one shut off on you in the middle of a race? I don’t care to count nor remember how many times it’s happened to me over the years. Maclan, though, has done something special. Their on/off switch is modular, similar to the fan and receiver wire. Option one is to plug it in to the port and use the switch to turn your car on or off. The second option is to not use it; once you plug the battery in, your car will turn on. Cool, right? But the interesting part is if you choose to use the switch and it should fail or become disconnected from the car, this will not cause a shutdown like every other on/off switch in the industry. Great feature.

Review: Maclan MaxPro 160A ESC with MRR 13.5T Brushless MotorPerformance
I decided to get my 4WD buggy ready for the next race day at the Master’s Of Dirt at BeachRC in Myrtle Beach, SC. I love this track – great owners, great people, great track, great hobby shop – and it yields some of the best racing in the south. What else can you ask for, right? So I figured there was no better time to test the new kid on the block than in a actual race day.

As I climbed up the stairway to RC heaven, I ran a pre-check through my head (hopefully silently) of what I set up on the ESC. The timing was set, I added a touch of drag brake and turned up the BEC to 7.4V to match my HV Futaba servo. As I sat and waited for traffic to pass, I gauged my possible performance with a couple buggys I was used to running with. I set the buggy down – sweaty palms, trying to look cool – time to stab the throttle. I’ve never seen my 4WD buggy wheely from a stand still. I think it had something to do with the new little black box controlling the power and the intense amount of grip the track provides.

The feeling is extremely linear, meaning I felt very connected to the car. Small throttle inputs around the track provided small increases or decreases in speed; it’s like I could actually feel the tires gaining or loosing grip. On the straight, the speed seems endless; it pulls extremely hard and almost dances on the tippy toes of the tires as it rockets into the first sweeper. It took a couple laps to really find my lift-point as the car has way more speed than my current tire setup can harness. I either have to slow down slightly (ya, right) or head back to the drawing board to find more grip. Maybe a combination of both; either way, this system is fast!

As I was turning laps and listening to times, I was on par with whom I was gauging my run with. The only real adjustments I had to make were for brake limitations simply because there was just too much braking power; turning it down to 55% provided the braking feel I was after.

Conclusion
As long as I have been racing, I’ve watched people buy the next great thing thinking it’s going to make them win the next Worlds. I know what it is like to oogle over something that the pros have that can never be one of your own. Well, with the new Maclan MMax Pro ESC and their new MRR motors, you’re going to be rushing to the front of the pack and tearing up the tracks near you. You’ll then be the envy and get oogled by others who are on the path to the checker flag. Enjoy, and see you in the A-Main!

Installation: 1=Complicated – 10=Easy: 6
Appearance – Fit & Finish: 10
Durability: 10
Value: 9
Price: 7.5

Connect
Maclan Racing, www.maclan-racing.com
TQ Wire, www.tqwire.com

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About Raul Garcia

Raul Garcia - As long as I have been doing this I have forgotten most of what I've done. I'm just a old dog in a new pack but have brought all of my bones with me. I hope to share some of my stories with experienced and non-experienced alike. I specialize in offroad and onroad electric racing but have participated in pretty much every form of racing to date on the ground. I dabble in flight, but don't ask me to put on goggles - I'd probably fall over. Leave it to the pros on that one. Everyone has their specialty and I know what I'm good at and have been doing this for almost 37 years. My first RC car was the Tamiya Super Champ, followed closely by the evolution - and had to have the RC10. There and then I was hooked. I look forward to the next event rubbing elbows and wheels to the checker flag! More articles by Raul Garcia

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